Reolysin® Infosheet

This Horizons Infosheet contains information on Reolysin, an oncolytic virus being investigated for the treatment of myeloma. The drugs described in the Horizons Infosheets may not be licensed and/or approved for use in myeloma. You may, however, be able to access them as part of a clinical trial.

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This Horizons Infosheet contains information on Reolysin, an oncolytic virus being investigated for the treatment of myeloma.

Reolysin, also known as pelareorep, is a type of oncolytic virus being investigated for the treatment of myeloma and
various other cancers. Oncolytic viruses infect and kill cancer cells. At the same time, they cause the immune system
to launch an immune response against the cancer cells, so their action against the cancer cells is increased.

Reolysin is given as an intravenous (IV) infusion over one hour. How often Reolysin is given (i.e. the number of ‘doses’) is still being investigated in clinical trials.

Reolysin is a laboratory-made version of a naturally occurring virus belonging to the reovirus family of viruses. Natural reovirus infection causes minor symptoms such as sore throat, sneezing and sniffles, mild diarrhoea, or sometimes no
symptoms at all. It is estimated that between 70 – 100% of adults have been infected with a reovirus at some point during their life. To date, the most commonly seen side-effects of Reolysin in clinical trials with myeloma patients have
been similar to those seen with natural reovirus infection: mild to moderate diarrhoea, fatigue, headache and flu-like symptoms.

Reolysin is not currently licensed for use in myeloma in the UK and is only accessible to patients as part of a clinical trial. For an up-to-date list of UK clinical trials involving Reolysin, visit the Myeloma Trial Finder on trials.myeloma.org.uk

To date, Reolysin has produced encouraging results in other advanced-stage cancers, and early phase results in myeloma
show it to be well tolerated and potentially effective when used in combination with other myeloma drugs. It continues to be studied in different patient groups and in different combinations.