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Revlimid® (AL amyloidosis) Infoguide

This Infoguide provides information about Revlimid, one of the treatments used in AL amyloidosis.

This Infoguide provides information about Revlimid, one of the treatments used in AL amyloidosis. It aims to:

  • Provide you with more information about Revlimid as a treatment for AL amyloidosis
  • Answer some of the more common questions about Revlimid
  • Help you make informed decisions about the treatment options available to you

Revlimid, also known as lenalidomide, is an immunomodulatory drug (IMiD). This means that it works by modifying the immune system. The main function of the immune system is to protect the body against disease and infection.

Revlimid is chemically similar to another IMiD used to treat AL amyloidosis called thalidomide. However, despite this similarity, Revlimid appears to cause less severe side-effects than thalidomide, which means that patients generally find it easier to tolerate. The potential side effects of Revlimid, how they can be prevented, treated and managed are described in the infosheet.

Like many other treatments for AL amyloidosis, Revlimid can be more effective when given alongside other drugs with
different but synergistic and complementary mechanisms of action. Revlimid is most often given with the steroid dexamethasone. Revlimid is also being studied in a variety of other combinations at different stages of AL amyloidosis in clinical trials.

Revlimid is given orally (in tablet form), usually for 21 days followed by a seven day rest period. This constitutes one 28-day cycle and treatment is normally continued until your AL amyloidosis progresses again i.e. it is given as continuous treatment until disease progression, rather than in a fixed number of treatment cycles.