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Join Myeloma UK’s new Peer Support Scheme

Other News // 23rd November 2021

We are delighted to announce the launch of Myeloma UK’s new Peer Programme – but we need your help to get this exciting scheme up and running.

We’re recruiting for two different volunteer roles: Peer Buddies and Peer Discussion Forum Volunteers.

As part of the Peer Buddy initiative, we’re looking for volunteers to be paired up with fellow patients or carers, share their experience and offer emotional and practical support. Peer Buddies will provide up to six support calls over a maximum of six weeks to each person they are buddied with. Support can be delivered either over the phone or online.

We’re also looking for Peer Discussion Forum Volunteers to share their experience and practical advice on the Myeloma UK discussion forum for two hours each week.

Prospective volunteers have until Wednesday 8 December to apply to join our very first cohort. Interviews will take place on Tuesday 14 and Wednesday 15 December.

Referrals into the Peer Buddy service will open at the end of January 2022.

To find out more about the Peer Programme and fill in an application form, head to myeloma.org.uk/peer

What is a Peer Buddy?

A Peer Buddy provides up to six sessions of telephone support to someone who would like to discuss myeloma or myeloma-related conditions.

Why would someone want support from a Peer Buddy?

Sometimes, when living with or going through treatment for myeloma or related conditions, patients receive care that is mainly focused on their physical health and symptom management. Some of the other aspects of living with myeloma or related conditions can take a back seat, or there are challenges that a medical team can’t always address. This is where a Peer Buddy can help. The peer relationship gives people an opportunity to talk about what they are going through with someone who has lived it.

Why would someone want to volunteer to be a Peer Buddy?

Many Peers find that sharing their own experiences with others in a similar situation can give their own mental health a boost. Supporting someone else can help a Peer turn what has been a negative experience into something positive that can help others.

I am a carer or family member of someone who has/has had myeloma or a myeloma-related condition, can I volunteer to be a Peer Buddy?

Yes! Myeloma UK recognises that carers and family members experience their own challenges, and we want to recruit carers and family members as Buddies too. Patients will be matched with patients and carers/family members will be matched with carers/family members.

I have a myeloma-related condition (e.g. MGUS), can I be a Peer Buddy?

Yes, we would like to recruit Peer Buddies who have myeloma-related conditions as well as myeloma patients.

Will I have to give medical advice?

Volunteers will never be asked to give anyone medical advice. Volunteers will only be expected to share their own experiences.

What is the commitment?

Myeloma UK anticipates high demand for these services, so we request a minimum six-month commitment.  We recognise that living with myeloma or related conditions can present health challenges that can impact on this commitment at short notice. We will always be sensitive to these challenges and encourage volunteers to be mindful of their own health whilst volunteering.