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Ixazomib (Ninlaro®) Infosheet

This Horizons Infosheet contains information on ixazomib (also known as Ninlaro®), a drug being investigated for the treatment of myeloma.

This Horizons Infosheet contains information on ixazomib (also known as Ninlaro®), a drug being investigated for the treatment of myeloma.

Like bortezomib (Velcade®) and carfilzomib (Kyprolis®), ixazomib belongs to a group of drugs known as proteasome inhibitors. Unlike bortezomib and carfilzomib which are given subcutaneously (under the skin) and intravenously (into the vein), ixazomib is the first oral (by mouth) proteasome inhibitor to be developed – this means it can be taken at home as a tablet instead of being administered in the hospital.

Ixazomib can be given as a monotherapy (used on its own and not in combination with other drugs) but it has been
shown to be most effective when used in combination with other myeloma treatments such as lenalidomide (Revlimid®) and dexamethasone.

The most common side-effects of ixazomib include: nausea, vomiting, constipation, diarrhoea, oedema (the retention of
abnormally large amounts of fluid in the body, causing swelling), skin rash and back pain. Like bortezomib, ixazomib can also cause peripheral neuropathy (damage to the nerves that make up the peripheral nervous system causing pain, tingling and altered sensation). However, in clinical trials ixazomib has been shown to cause lower rates of peripheral
neuropathy than bortezomib, possibly due to it being more targeted. Ixazomib is known to cause low platelet counts, which may increase your risk of nose bleeds and bruising.

Ixazomib continues to be studied in different myeloma patient groups and in different treatment combinations. These trials will provide information about the safest and most effective way to use ixazomib in myeloma.